WEST VIRGINIAN ‘MEXICAN’ DIP

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INGREDIENTS

2 8oz cream cheese boxes
2 big spoonfuls sour cream.
2 pkgs of taco seasoning
shredded lettuce
chopped black olives
chopped green pepper
chopped tomatoes
4 cups shredded Mexican Cheese

PREPARATION

Beat cream cheese and sour cream together til smooth, add taco seasoning. Spread on large glass dish…top with lettuce, Green onion (if you like onion) Tomatoes and black olives sliced. Top with cheddar cheese…use any corn chips you desire. Best part of this is you can add more or less toppings to the base depending on tastes and kids love it too. I recommend using disposable 9×13 aluminum pan if taking this dish to a party or picnic. It can be split into 2 round cake pans if you have picky eaters too!

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DIRTY DR PEPPER

Dirty-Dr.-Pepper-by-SimplyGloria.com-DirtyDrinksHave you had a DIRTY drink yet?

I am not much of a soda drinker.  But, I LOVE Dr. Pepper… once in a blue moon.  And, when it’s a DIRTY DR. PEPPER…I could seriously drink this every single day!

This recipe makes 1 dirty drink.

Ingredients
  • 12 oz. can of Dr. Pepper (or your favorite soda)
  • 2 oz. coconut syrup
  • juice from 1 lime
  • crushed ice
Instructions
  1. Put crushed ice into a large glass.
  2. Pour soda, coconut syrup, and fresh lime juice into the ice.
  3. Stir and drink.
  4. Enjoy!
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THE QUEENS OF TEXAS

dairyqueenAlong the cracked and endless highways of rural Texas, certain types of landmarks appear repeatedly. Whitewashed grain elevators rise on the horizon, like flags marking the settlements below. Larger towns have schools, and almost every town has a water tower. Wherever Main Street is, the courthouse sits at the end of it. There’s the cemetery, and there are the churches. Then, if the town is big enough, there’s the Dairy Queen.

For residents, the Dairy Queen is at once a restaurant, meet up spot, and place to pass the time. For travelers, the Dairy Queen is an oasis; it’s what transforms a blur of buildings into a real, memorable place. As a native of the relatively large (population 212,169) city of Lubbock, which is six hours from everywhere, I’ve always appreciated rural Dairy Queens. At home, my family never goes to a Dairy Queen. On the road, though, we sometimes start planning our orders hours in advance. And yet I’ve never known how Dairy Queen came to be the small town restaurant of Texas.

A few weeks ago, I traveled to Idalou (population 2,157) to sit at the Dairy Queen and ponder Texans’ affection for the brand. It was a Sunday, and church had just let out. Almost every seat was full. A little boy in church clothes carefully deconstructed a vanilla cone. An old man and woman sat on the same side of a table, the woman feeding the man a Blizzard. All over the state, citizens of small towns had made the same ritual Sunday trip, and within a few hours, before the wind picked up, everyone went home.

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Searching for Dairy Queen in Google’s newspaper archives:

In 1997, Warren Buffet buys Dairy Queen for $585 million. In the 1950s, Dairy Queen goes national. In the 1940s, Dairy Queen ceases to be a restaurant and becomes an honorific. “A Dairy Queen was chosen. She is willowy Willough Thomas.” “Miss Alice Baker, 18 year-old Dairy Queen of Wisconsin, arrived yesterday … to celebrate the climax of Cheese Week.” All over the country, “girls 17 to unmarried” pursue the coveted title. Prior to 1900, America fades from the news. Real monarchs appear. “The Queen is one of the most enthusiastic farmers in the British Isles … there is not a dairy in the three kingdoms that can hold a candle to the dairy at Shaw Farm, Windsor.”

Asking around about Dairy Queen, I eventually encountered Robert Mayfield. In the 1940s, Mayfield’s father, Tolbert, a cattleman who traveled between Kansas and Texas, happened to stop at a Dairy Queen in Forth Worth, and decided to open his own. Though an attorney by training, Robert Mayfield now operates a small fleet of stores. “My son does a lot for me,” he said when I called him. “But I’m still the emperor.”

When Tolbert Mayfield opened his stores, franchising was new, and Dairy Queens were spreading rapidly across Texas. Most of the innovation came from franchisees. “My dad was experimenting with drive-in windows, and even the first dining rooms, if you can believe that,” said Robert. Another second-generation operator, Perry Anderson, told me Texas Dairy Queens were the first to serve food. In January of 1950, Anderson’s dad became one of the earliest franchisees to sell hamburgers. To this day, Texas Dairy Queens offer a food menu unique to the state.

One later franchisee innovation is Robert Mayfield’s favorite frozen item: the Blizzard. It’s a product Dairy Queen aficionados are generally enthusiastic about. In 1985 alone, a year after a St. Louis operator inspired by Ted Drewe’s frozen custard made a prototype, Dairy Queen sold 175 million Blizzards nationwide.

“I tell you, they’re all good, man,” Mayfield said. “You see how they mix ‘em up? I don’t know how it does it, but when they beat it up it beats out all the calories. It’s like, W.C. Fields would say, ‘I’ve never met a bottle I didn’t like.’ I’ve never met a Blizzard I didn’t like.”

In Crosbyton (population 1,874) on another Sunday, the church crowd had already gone home for the day and the famous West Texas wind was blowing full gale. A flagpole wire pinged wildly against its pole. At the deserted Dairy Queen, I ordered a Snickers Blizzard. The machine beat out the calories. Would the server turn the Blizzard upside down? She turned the Blizzard upside down. Mayfield told me that Blizzards do sometimes fall out. But in Crosbyton mine stayed put.

The Blizzard has been good for Dairy Queen, but neither it nor Dairy Queen itself would exist without soft serve ice cream. After all, Sherb Noble opened the first store in Joliet, Illinois, only to sell the soft serve his friends, J.F. “Grandpa” McCullough and his son, Alex, had invented. Today, of course, soft serve is not so glamorous or novel as it was when it first debuted. Having now considered it in detail, however, I think I should offer some praise for soft serve ice cream.

First off: soft serve is cheap and soft serve is low in fat. (Unlike Mayfield’s claim about Blizzards, this is actually true.)

Furthermore, because soft serve doesn’t freeze your mouth, it tastes better than hard ice cream. That was Grandpa McCullough’s theory, anyway, and Dairy Queen boosters have treated it as gospel ever since. I haven’t done a taste comparison, but I did tackle a monstrous Brown Derby (chocolate dip cone) in Aspermont (population 1,021). In size and shape, it recalled a Dr. Seuss mountain. Tens of millions of Whos could have lived on top; even with the help of my mom and dog, I couldn’t finish it. Though I can’t say how soft serve compares to other ice creams I’ve had, I will say that it was delicious—and that the structure itself was a modern-day miracle.

Finally, and most importantly, soft serve requires a machine. A machine, in turn, requires a store. Not quite solid, and made largely of air, soft serve can’t survive a freezer. You can’t buy soft serve in a carton. Every cone requires an excursion into the world. It is a public ice cream, meant to be eaten fresh. Following the invention of soft serve, the creation of thousands of new places to go and sit and eat it was almost inevitable.

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20 WEIRD EATERIES ‘ROUND THE WORLD

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Today, everyone eats out. And some eateries go to great lengths to attract customers. Many new restaurants round the globe are being built with a view of pulling in people that might ordinarily walk right past them.  Many ore being built according to a theme, and some of the ideas are rather weird. Food, of course, is the prime consideration, followed by service. But some places offer both food and service as well as a memorable experience that goes way past what’s on the menu. Here’s our top 20.

Calico Cat Café

The first menu you’ll see at Calico Cat Café in Tokyo has nothing to do with food: it’s the cat selection. But you won’t be dining on any of these adorable felines – they’re just there to provide some companionship while you sip a cup of tea. The watchful staff ensures that guests treat the cats respectfully, and provide complimentary bags of dried cat food that can be used to attract your desired playmate. For many Tokyo residents, owning a cat isn’t realistic, so the city’s 30-odd cat cafés give them a chance to enjoy some “commitment-free cat stroking”.

Devil Island Prison Restaurant

Devil Island Prison Restaurant

The owner of the Devil Island restaurants in China reportedly wanted to scare people away from a life of crime by showing them just how rough prison life can be – through a jail-themed restaurant where you’re led to your table in handcuffs and served fried coffin-shaped bread. Each table is surrounded by rusting prison bars, and you’re served by waiters in black-and-white striped uniforms. A similar restaurant in Beijing is misleadingly named ‘Zen Cool’.

Ice Restaurant in Dubai

Ice Restaurant in Dubai

Almost everything at the restaurant is sculpted out of ice. Diners will sit on ice benches or chairs, eat at ice tables, out of ice plates, drink from ice glasses served from a bar made of ice.the restaurant is Dubai-based Sharaf Group’s enterprise while technical inputs came from Canada-based Iceculture Inc, who are credited with building ice lounges around the world.

A380 In-Flight Kitchen

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Mmm, airplane food. If you just can’t get enough of eating on airplanes but you’re sick of going through security and paying expensive airfare to do it, you may want to visit the A380 In-Flight Kitchen in Taipei. The restaurant resembles the inside of a plane, with faux oval-shaped windows, baggage compartments and speckled blue seats complete with headrests. Waitresses dress like flight attendants, and “passengers” have much more than just chicken or fish to choose from.

 Underwater Restaurant in Maldives

Underwater Restaurant in Maldives

Beautiful underwater restaurant secured 5 metres below sea level at the Hilton Maldives Resort & Spa in Rangalifinolhu, Maldives. The restaurant has a capacity of 14 people and is encased in transparent acrylic roof offering 270° panoramic view to its customers.

Dinner in the Sky

Dinner in the Sky

Not everyone can stomach eating a meal while dangling 150 feet above the ground from a crane, even if you’re not usually afraid of heights. At Dinner in the Sky in Belgium, diners are strapped into chairs, raised to half the height of Big Ben and served meals like ham salad and sauteed prawns that are cooked in a small oven in the center of the structure.

 

Toilet Restaurant in Taiwan

Toilet Restaurant in Taiwan

Creative restaurant in Taipei, Taiwan with modern decor and full-on toilet theme. Marton Theme Restaurant in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, has toilet concept for their unique restaurant. They decorate the room and the chairs that created just like toilets. Tables created to look like bathtubs, and food will be served on plates and bowls that designed like toilet seats too. Customers love their delicious food combined with the toilet design make special sensation.

 Dinner in a Hospital

Dinner in a Hospital

Taipei is known for its variety of strangely themed dining establishments, but this one might just take the cake. Your surreal experience starts with the name, D.S. Music Restaurant, which in no way hints at what’s actually inside. Wait staff dressed in nurse uniforms push you to your table in wheelchairs, where your drinks are served from an IV-like contraption hanging from the ceiling. The ‘nurses’ ask trivia questions, and if you get them right, you’re rewarded with shots of a tasty drink squirted into your mouth with a syringe. It only gets a stranger from there. Once you’re done eating, a female staff member in a deranged ballerina costume dances on your table.

 Cannibalistic Restaurant

Cannibalistic Restaurant

The food called as Nyotaimori, means ‘female body plate’ is one of the weird and unique food from a Japanese restaurant. The restaurant serves Japanese food sushi and sashimi inside a woman’s body. The body  is made from food and placed on a table looks like surgery table in hospital. Customers can eat any part of the body. The unique part is when we cut the body, it will look like bleeding just like human body, ouchh..

Dining in The Dark Restaurant

Dining in The Dark Restaurant

Dining in the Dark Restaurant is located in Beijing, China. All the restaurant rooms designed so black and so dark. Incoming visitors will be guide to the table by waiters that equipped with night view binoculars. Flashlights, mobile phones, and watches not available in this area. Visitors can only smell and taste the food by eating them in the dark. Just use your senses to enjoy the food.

Tombs Restaurant

Tombs Restaurant

This weird restaurant is famous with the menu such as milk-tea, bread rolls and the tombs between the tables. Located in Ahmedabad, India, the restaurant owner claimed to have open this restaurant for 40 years hereditary, but never know who are buried beneath these graves.

 

Yellow Treehouse Café

Yellow Treehouse Café

Built around a redwood tree near Auckland, New Zealand, the Yellow Treehouse Café will fulfill all of your fantasies about treehouse life, and then some. Designed by Pacific Environment Architects as part of a marketing campaign for the area’s yellow pages, the café is no longer open for dinner but can be rented for private parties.

 Princess Heart

Princess Heart

Some girls never outgrow their princess fantasies, and if you live in Japan, you can luxuriate in all the frilly pink princess regalia you can stomach whenever you want at the Princess Heart restaurant.  Customers are led to a full-length mirror where they’re apparently supposed to ask who’s the fairest one of all, before taking a seat in a throne and being crowned. Women can drag their male partners along, but single men aren’t allowed.

Wizard of the Opera

Wizard of the Opera

Billed as “gorgeous gothic dining”, the Wizard of the Opera restaurant in Tokyo has a vaguely Phantom of the Opera-based theme, with lots of sumptuous red velvet and the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical soundtrack on repeat. Among the dishes served are smoked salmon shaped like a rose, and the staff will even write the word ‘opera’ in chocolate on your plate.

 Dick’s Last Resort Restaurant

Dick’s Last Resort Restaurant

If you’re more of a masochist than a sadist, Dick’s Last Resort Restaurant may be just up your alley. With locations all over America including Chicago, Boston and Dallas, Dick’s will satisfy your impulses to be treated rudely, called names and ridiculed by restaurant staff. If that sounds like everyday dining to you, rest assured that Dick’s will kindly write out these insults and put them on dunce caps which you’re obligated to wear while eating.

Mars Restaurant

Mars Restaurant

Want to know how does it feel dining on the Mars? Just visit right in New York’s Times Square location. When visitors arrived, friendly Martians will guide hungry human from earth into the hot and dry red planet. In this place human can eat on the Martian Seafood Platter, on Mars Seafood Platter, with a typical menu of sea scallops, shrimp, squid, clams with seafood sauce.

Condom Restaurant

Condom Restaurant

Cabbages and condoms is the name of this restaurant located in Thailand. There are many types of condom display on the wall, carpet and painting too. After paying the bill, visitors will be given condoms at the cashier. The profit of this restaurant used to support a foundation called Population and Community Development Association (PDA).

 

Ninja New York

Ninja New York

Some of New York’s most creative fusion food is served in a rather unusual restaurant, one in which no expense was spared to create an atmosphere that one reviewer described as “Ninja Disneyland”. Guests are led to the subterranean eatery through a “secret path” where “ninjas” lurk in the shadows, and brought to a table housed within a dungeon-like chamber.  The ninja waiters perform magic tricks that extend into the meal, like sauces that catch on fire.

 Hardwired Host

Hardwired Host

Hajime Restaurant in Bangkok, Thailand. Robot run. Owner Lapassarad Thanaphant (pictured) has high hopes for her robot-run restaurant. Thanaphant invested nearly $1 million to purchase four dancing (yes, they also dance!) robots who serve diners Japanese delicacies.

 

The Long and Winding Road

The Long and Winding Road

 Restaurant name’s Baggers, Nuremberg, Germany. Roller-coaster service. At this futuristic eatery, the wait staff is a thing of the past. Guests place their orders via a touch-screen computer at each table. When the food — which, according to the restaurant, is based primarily on local, organic ingredients and cooked with minimal fat — is ready, it zips to the table along a twisting track from the kitchen above.

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10 HOLLYWOOD DIVES YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

We can all agree that Los Angeles is a swanky city. Most places you go are naturally pristine and glamorous, one of the city’s hallmarks. On the other end of the spectrum, a lot of places are intentionally greasy, like some Silver Lake hairline. Things are either far too pretty or far too dirty: both are façades to create a sense of “cool,” “swank.”

Such airs are common and, even though different, are essentially the same. This gets you to thinking: do real grungy places exist in Hollywood? Do dive bars even exist out here? Well, yes and no.

Real dive bars do exist; but, like all things L.A., they are primped to a certain degree. Thus, we’ve compiled a list of ten Hollywood dives you should know about, in order of least divey to most divey. All of these places are very intimate, nearly standing room-only, bars that are fairly affordable and definitely all have their own characteristics. If you want a low key drink, don’t want too much pretense, these are places you can go to where it’s possible everyone may know your name. [Photo via]

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1. The Woods

A dive with a makeover, The Woods is the gem of a North La Brea strip mall. Sandwiched between a liquor store and a Middle Eastern restaurant, the place is very unassuming and mysterious. Inside, though, you will find a very cool place. Wooded walls and a warm candle light glow, this place is occasionally the stomping ground for some celebrities, decent DJs, and a seemingly homeless man who sells bunny rabbits outside. The drinks are good and reasonably priced and you’re guaranteed to have a good time. But, don’t let the outdoorsy title and dive nature let you get too casual: they’re very strict on dress code and behavior.

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2. The Well

The Woods’ sister, The Well is nearly as nice–but, is known for its great Happy Hour (5PM – 9PM, $4 – $6 drinks). Tucked away, with the Nickelodeon on Sunset studios in direct sight, this bar is a box with semi-awkward wall seating. It’s fairly low key and has a warmer vibe than its sister, who seems to have a big chip on her shoulder about things. Beyond location, overall vibe, and Happy Hour, The Well and The Woods are not very different at all. The Well just needs to work on getting its own bunny man…

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3. The Mission Cantina

Practically a hallway next to Delancey, The Mission Cantina is part Mexican restaurant, part Mexican bar: it is a dive that belongs South of the border. With hundreds of tequilas to choose from, it’s a distilled version of Malo, serving up equally splendid margaritas (even by the pitcher!) and their own dollar taco night ($1 Taco Tuesdays!). Their affordable menu is the perfect bar food for you to ring up at a moment’s notice, should you feel you need to balance out your tequila intake. The Mission Cantina is definitely a place you can stop into just for a drink, but is the closest thing on this list to a dive-bar-with-a-full-kitchen.

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4. The Bar

This is a mysterious place: there doesn’t seem to be any particular theme, mentality, or name here besides “The Bar.” Thus, the glory that is The Bar, located on Sunset at Bronson beneath Hotel St. Moritz (who is desperately begging for a boutique hotel makeover). Typically filled with attractive people, some chain smokers in the back, hot female bartenders, and a DJ mixing semi-ironic tunes a little too loudly, this dark bar is quite the scene on weekends and quickly fills up. However, this alleyway of a bar can be quite the cute location for a drink date during the week.

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5. Piano Bar

Hidden away from the Hollywood scene on Cahuenga, Piano Bar gathers all of the Hollyweirds together to listen to live music. This dark place is known for its blues and cheap, strong drinks as well as being the stomping ground of many different local cultures. A direct result of its history, this once very unappealing bar has become quite cool in its being flipped by the fantastic Houston Twins. Yet, even though it was revamped, the bar has still clung on to its divey past. Depending on which night you go, you are likely to slide right back into its yesteryears, bluesy twang included.

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6. Three Clubs

Three Clubs is a very mysterious bar. Firstly, it is the darkest bar on this list: there is literally one light above the bartender—the rest of the lighting is left to small candles on each table and dim, dim, dim side lighting. Secondly, it doubles as a bar and a venue. Like The Bar, Three Clubs’ only real theme is its being dark and divey. One word of advice: bring quarters and play something on the jukebox. Otherwise, the place is really, really, really quiet on an empty night.

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7. Tiki Ti

We all know and love Tiki Ti. But, no one really takes it seriously: does a tiki bar sound all that interesting to you? Well, if it doesn’t, you’re lame. With the most attitude on the list, Tiki Ti doesn’t give a shit who you are or why you are here: just bring your cash, order your island drink, smoke your indoor cigarettes, and GTFO. Only capable of holding, maybe, thirty people, Tiki Ti is slightly the obnoxious dive in L.A.—but, it has the right to be: the bar has been around since 1961 and privately owned. Talk about putting on airs… [Photo via]

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8. Whitehorse Inn Cocktail Lounge

If any bar could be confused for your German grandmother’s basement, flooded in red light, it would be Whitehorse Inn Cocktail Lounge. Housed underneath the Super 8 on Western, Whitehorse Inn Cocktail Lounge is virtually empty during the week but fills up beyond belief during the weekend, oftentimes to the point of a wait outside. A cash-only bar, we would be remiss if we did not mention the bar’s hallmark: the older German woman that owns the bar and serves as bartender. She is known to force microwaved hot dogs, crackers, cubed cheese, Tootsie Rolls, and other assorted candies on you. Drunk German grandmother? YES, PLEASE.

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9. Coach and Horses

Coach and Horses is a hallway, regardless of which way you stack it: it is a hallway that serves bottled (bottled?!?) PBR you have to pay for with cash. The staff is very nice and the clientele is very, very neighborhoody and friendly. That being said, Coach and Horses is a lot of fun if you can tolerate standing in a hallway that gets a little bit too loud and approaches a part of Sunset that you don’t necessarily want to be.

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10. Power House

By far the diviest and most random bar to grace Los Angeles, Power House is located on the Northeast block of Hollywood and Highland (!?!?!?!!). Filled with a brilliantly grungy crowd of locals and, somehow, keeping out the touristy riff raff, Power House is Hollywood’s most authentic dive. They have dart boards, a jukebox, a mean doorman, cheap beer—what doesn’t sound appealing about this place? It’s truly a misplaced gem that you would never guess was across the street from a Gap.

Power House is the must dive of Hollywood dives.

 

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KNOWING YOUR TURKISH KEBABS

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Just about everyone I know hankers after a honest-to-god Turkish kebab from time to time, but how many of us are kebab literate?  If your appetite runs in this direction, do yourself a favor – discover the variety and flavorsome characters of the many different kinds of kebabs that are out there, or yours for the making.  If there’s a good kebab joint in your area, save yourself the confusion by checking out the range of kebabs that may be on offer, and make an ‘educated’ choice when you make your next order.  There are quite a few to choose from, and they’re as delicious as they are different. Maximize your Turkish taste sensation by having a look at the list below. Forget your late-night, generic kebab shop disasters. This stuff is the real deal.

Kebab 1: The Testi kebab

Testi kebabA cross between a stew and a pie with meat, pearl onions and vegetables cooked in a clay pot then sealed with dough (no testes were harmed in the making of this kebab).

 

Kebab 2: The Tokat kebab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veal, potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, onion and garlic in pita bread.

 

Kebab 3: The Iskender kebab

Iskender KebabThin strips of lamb piled on a pita bread and topped with spicy tomato sauce, butter and yoghurt.

 

Kebab 4: The Döner kebab

Döner usually refers to the meat that sits in on a large, vertical, rotating skewer and is cooked over hot coals. It looks a bit like a baby elephants leg. Traditionally eaten either in pita or on rice, with salads and hummus.

 

Kebab 5: Adana kebab

Adana kebabMade with mince instead of chunks of meat – the adana kebab is a little different from its delicious cousins. It’s also usually pretty spicy – so be sure to ask for an urfa kebab (the non-hot version) if spice isn’t your thing.

 

Kebab 6: The Ramadan kebab

Grilled meat served on a pide with garlic, tomato, yoghurt and mint. Really good.

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ROCK-COLA CAFE

lrockSituated at 5730 Brookville Road, Indianapolis, on the city’s south east side, Rock-Cola Café is definitely a destination restaurant. If you’re in the mood for a hearty slice of 50s nostalgia and some equally heart-stopping grub, then this quirky little establishment is well worth the visit.

Housed in a modest commercial building, Rock-Cola transports you back to a time and place that most of us only know from movies and music. The interior, cozy to say the least, is furnished with a few stools at the counter and a handful of booths, but if you come at an off-hour, as we recently did, then it shouldn’t be too hard to get a seat.

From the moment you step in the door, it’s Fifties all the way: walls and ceiling are festooned with movie posters, newspaper cuttings and plenty of James Dean memorabilia. The booths are equipped with strange little game machines: the kind where you insert a quarter and try to flip it through a basketball hoop. The music, naturally, is all from the era.

Unlike your average greasy spoon, Rock-Cola Café is clean with friendly, efficient service. Orders are taken promptly, and food comes out when it’s ready, which on our visit was pretty quickly. Lunch items appear on the Ben-Hur of menus, running to five pages. To do this place justice would require either multiple visits or an army of accomplices. To get a feel for the food, my wife and I ordered a handful of dishes we felt might be representative.

To start, we tried the Jumbo Sampler Basket for $6.99. This consists of fries, onion rings, jalapeno poppers and shrimp, all breaded and deep fried. Everything was clean, crisp and nicely breaded. The jalapeno poppers had a decent kick to them and were clearly house-made, and the shrimp were impressive for their crunchy texture and fresh flavor.

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Next came a brace of sandwiches: the Grilled Tenderloin ($5.99) and the 10oz Cheeseburger for $4.99 or $8.99 with fries and a regular drink. The tenderloin, weighing in at 12 ounces uncooked, was done perfectly: tender and packed with flavor. Served on a soft and very fresh bun, it was an excellent sandwich for a casual lunch. The burger, again served simply, was remarkably beefy: Clearly made in-house and without filler, it was the very essence of burger-ness, although it could have been cooked just a little bit less.

 

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